Monday, June 30, 2014

Quantum Computing Explained by Isaac McAuley

This video shows how quantum computers work (in theory). It goes over how superposition and quantum entanglement can be used to change the world of computers.

Saturday, May 17, 2014
HYPERMORGEN ICONS
We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 
Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.
We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook! 
Get the Icons at the The Noun Project! 
The icons en detail:
Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more] 
Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more] 
Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more] 
Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more] 
Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more] 
Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more] 
Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more] 
Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more] 
+++ THX A LOT +++
Fast.co Exist: Icons For The Near Future, From Printable Meat To Autonomous Car Warnings - These visuals create a thought-provoking shorthand for the issues that will be created by our emerging technologies.
Bruce Sterling: Design Fiction - Hypermorgen icons
PSFK: Simple Icons Help Visualize - The Trends Of The Near     Future

HYPERMORGEN ICONS

We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 

Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.

We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook

Get the Icons at the The Noun Project

The icons en detail:

  • Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more
  • Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more
  • Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
  • Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more
  • Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more
  • Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
  • 3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more
  • Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more
  • Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more
  • Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more

+++ THX A LOT +++

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

txchnologist:

BBC Knowledge and Learning explains the basics of genetics with style. Watch the whole video below.

Read More

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
Prediction or Influence?
A History of Books that Forecast the Future
[via io9]

Prediction or Influence?

A History of Books that Forecast the Future

[via io9]

Sunday, April 27, 2014

pewinternet:

Our recent survey with Smithsonian magazine on Americans’ attitudes toward the future of science and technology found some striking differences between women and men in their hopes and fears about the future. Here are a few key themes.

Sunday, April 20, 2014 Wednesday, April 9, 2014

txchnologist:

App Uses Google Glass To Diagnose Disease

The American Chemical Society has the story of some interesting work that might let healthcare providers use Google Glass for medical testing. 

UCLA researchers have built an app that lets users take pictures of test samples and upload them for remote diagnostic analysis. The system can already perform dozens of different tests, including those for malaria, prostate cancer and HIV. The work effectively removes the need for a nearby brick-and-mortar laboratory to analyze samples.

Watch the video, and read about more breakthrough work being done by UCLA engineer Aydogan Ozcan and his group.

Read More

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Keeping secrets in a world of spies and mistrust

Artur Ekert, co-inventor of quantum cryptography, explains in Nature what it takes to keep our secrets secret, even when faced with the double challenge of mistrust and manipulation.

Want to learn more? See the article “The ultimate physical limits of privacy” in Nature:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13132

Or this summary on CQT’s website: http://www.quantumlah.org/highlight/1…

Artur Ekert is Director of the Centre for Quantum Technologies and Lee Kong Chian Centennial Professor, National University of Singapore, Professor of Quantum Physics at the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK

Abstract of Nature paper

Among those who make a living from the science of secrecy, worry and paranoia are just signs of professionalism. Can we protect our secrets against those who wield superior technological powers? Can we trust those who provide us with tools for protection? Can we even trust ourselves, our own freedom of choice? Recent developments in quantum cryptography show that some of these questions can be addressed and discussed in precise and operational terms, suggesting that privacy is indeed possible under surprisingly weak assumptions.

[via kurzweilAI] [Paper]

Friday, March 21, 2014 Monday, February 24, 2014
emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check

Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.
A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.

Full Story: Io9

emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check

Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.

A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.

Full Story: Io9

Friday, February 21, 2014
Scientists just created some of the most powerful muscles in existence
Great longread from io9 on artificial muscles for humanoid robots, prosthetics or filters, developed by the NanoTech Institute at the University of Texas at Dallas:

In a surprising breakthrough for the world of materials science, researchers have created some of the most powerful artificial muscles we’ve ever seen. And they did it with simple fishing line. These freakishly strong and cheap muscles could revolutionize robotics, and perhaps one day our own bodies.

Excellent gif btw.

[read more] [Paper]

Scientists just created some of the most powerful muscles in existence

Great longread from io9 on artificial muscles for humanoid robots, prosthetics or filters, developed by the NanoTech Institute at the University of Texas at Dallas:

In a surprising breakthrough for the world of materials science, researchers have created some of the most powerful artificial muscles we’ve ever seen. And they did it with simple fishing line. These freakishly strong and cheap muscles could revolutionize robotics, and perhaps one day our own bodies.

Excellent gif btw.

[read more] [Paper]

Saturday, February 15, 2014
joshbyard:

New Experiments Are Another Big Step Toward Nuclear Fusion Power

In each trial, 192 laser beams briefly fired into a half-inch-long gold cylinder. The cylinder held a tiny ball that contained the fuel, which was a mix of two kinds of hydrogen, called deuterium and tritium. The energy from the lasers kicked off a process that compressed the ball by an amount akin to squeezing a basketball down to the size of a pea, says Debbie Callahan, an author of the paper.
That created the extremely high pressure and temperatures needed to get the hydrogen atoms to fuse. It was all over in the blink of an eye, with the reaction confined to a space smaller than the width of a human hair.
Nuclear fusion would be worthwhile only if it produces more energy than it uses, and the results were far from that. The hydrogen fuel did emit more energy than it absorbed from the lasers, an experimental goal. But the fuel took in only about 1 percent of all the energy produced by the lasers. So the apparatus is still far short of producing more energy than it requires to operate.
Another key finding was evidence that energy created by the fusion reaction was going back into the remaining fuel, a “bootstrapping” process that is key to boosting the energy output.
"Seeing that kick in is quite exciting, and it does show that there is promise" for increasing the energy output, says Omar Hurricane, lead author on the Nature paper. It’s not clear when researchers will be able to get more energy out of the reaction than the lasers pour into it, he said, but "we are working like mad… in that direction."
The sign of bootstrapping is “really a wonderful result,” says fusion expert Robert McCrory of the Univ. of Rochester, who was not involved in the research. “There’s a lot more that needs to be done” to reach the point where the reaction produces more energy than the lasers deliver, but “this was absolutely necessary.”

(via Scientists Take Step Toward Nuclear Fusion ht laboratoryequipment,  see also : Advance Brings Fusion Power Closer | txchnologist)

joshbyard:

New Experiments Are Another Big Step Toward Nuclear Fusion Power

In each trial, 192 laser beams briefly fired into a half-inch-long gold cylinder. The cylinder held a tiny ball that contained the fuel, which was a mix of two kinds of hydrogen, called deuterium and tritium. The energy from the lasers kicked off a process that compressed the ball by an amount akin to squeezing a basketball down to the size of a pea, says Debbie Callahan, an author of the paper.

That created the extremely high pressure and temperatures needed to get the hydrogen atoms to fuse. It was all over in the blink of an eye, with the reaction confined to a space smaller than the width of a human hair.

Nuclear fusion would be worthwhile only if it produces more energy than it uses, and the results were far from that. The hydrogen fuel did emit more energy than it absorbed from the lasers, an experimental goal. But the fuel took in only about 1 percent of all the energy produced by the lasers. So the apparatus is still far short of producing more energy than it requires to operate.

Another key finding was evidence that energy created by the fusion reaction was going back into the remaining fuel, a “bootstrapping” process that is key to boosting the energy output.

"Seeing that kick in is quite exciting, and it does show that there is promise" for increasing the energy output, says Omar Hurricane, lead author on the Nature paper. It’s not clear when researchers will be able to get more energy out of the reaction than the lasers pour into it, he said, but "we are working like mad… in that direction."

The sign of bootstrapping is “really a wonderful result,” says fusion expert Robert McCrory of the Univ. of Rochester, who was not involved in the research. “There’s a lot more that needs to be done” to reach the point where the reaction produces more energy than the lasers deliver, but “this was absolutely necessary.”

(via Scientists Take Step Toward Nuclear Fusion ht laboratoryequipment,  see also : Advance Brings Fusion Power Closertxchnologist)

Friday, February 14, 2014

joshbyard:

ISS Launches Largest Ever Flock of CubeSats, Data Will Be Open to Public

A new fleet of 28 small satellites, called Flock 1… the largest single constellation of Earth-imaging satellites ever to launch into space, …began deploying today from the International Space Station. 

Built and operated by Planet Labs of San Francisco, the Flock 1 small satellites are individually referred to as Doves. The Dove satellites are part of a class of miniature satellites often called CubeSats. These small satellites will capture imagery of Earth for use in humanitarian, environmental and commercial applications. Data collected by the Flock 1 constellation will be universally accessible to anyone who wishes to use it.

“We believe that the democratization of information about a changing planet is the mission that we are focused on, and that, in and of itself, is going to be quite valuable for the planet,” says Robbie Schingler, co-founder of Planet Labs. “One tenet that we have is to make sure that we produce more value than we actually capture, so we have an open principle within the company with respect to anyone getting access to the data.”

(via Largest Flock of Earth-Imaging Satellites Launch into Orbit From Space Station ht crookedindifference)

Wednesday, February 12, 2014
HYPERMORGEN ICONS
We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 
Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.
We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook! 
Get the Icons at the The Noun Project! 
The icons en detail:
Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more] 
Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more] 
Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more] 
Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more] 
Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more] 
Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more] 
Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more] 
Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more] 

HYPERMORGEN ICONS

We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 

Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.

We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook

Get the Icons at the The Noun Project

The icons en detail:

  • Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more
  • Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more
  • Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
  • Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more
  • Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more
  • Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
  • 3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more
  • Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more
  • Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more
  • Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more
Thursday, January 30, 2014
HYPERMORGEN ICONS
We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 
Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.
We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook! 
Get the Icons at the The Noun Project! 
The icons en detail:
Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more] 
Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more] 
Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more] 
Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more] 
Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more] 
Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more] 
Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more] 
Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more] 

+++ THX A LOT +++
Fast.co Exist: Icons For The Near Future, From Printable Meat To Autonomous Car Warnings - These visuals create a thought-provoking shorthand for the issues that will be created by our emerging technologies.
Bruce Sterling: Design Fiction - Hypermorgen icons
PSFK: Simple Icons Help Visualize - The Trends Of The Near     Future
Stern.de: Warnschilder aus der Zukunft
Motherboard: Berliner Designer entwickeln die Zeichen der Zukunft

HYPERMORGEN ICONS

We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 

Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.

We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook

Get the Icons at the The Noun Project

The icons en detail:

  • Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more
  • Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more
  • Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
  • Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more
  • Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more
  • Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
  • 3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more
  • Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more
  • Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more
  • Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more

+++ THX A LOT +++