Friday, September 5, 2014

neurosciencestuff:

Chinese Doctors Use 3D-Printing in Pioneering Surgery to Replace Half of Man’s Skull

Surgeons at Xijing Hospital in Xi’an, Shaanxi province in Northwest China are using 3D-printing in a pioneering surgery to help rebuild the skull of a man who suffered brain damage in a construction accident.

Hu, a 46-year-old farmer, was overseeing construction to expand his home in Zhouzhi county last October when he was hit by a pile of wood and fell down three storeys.

Although he survived the fall, the left side of his skull was severely crushed and the shattered bone fragments needed to be removed, which has led to a depression of one side of his head.

Due to his injuries, Hu cannot see well out of his left eye, experiences double vision (diplopia) and is also unable to speak and write.

Read more

Thursday, August 28, 2014

A Drop Of Power Makes Hydrogen Fuel From Water

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

Scientists have made a breakthrough in generating hydrogen gas fuel by splitting water with small amounts of electricity. 

Stanford University researchers report that they have disassembled water molecules into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen with the electromotive force of a single AAA battery. Both gaseous products are flammable and hydrogen is considered a viable power source for electricity production and vehicles. In fact, the first hydrogen fuel cell cars will be available for purchase in the US beginning in 2015.

The Stanford group also accomplished the low-power water splitting, a process called water electrolysis, without the expensive precious metals typically used. They put two electrodes in a beaker of water and sent current through them, which broke the liquid into the two gases.

image

Read More

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

txchnologist:

Graphene-Based Artificial Retina Sensor Being Developed

Researchers at Germany’s Technical University of Munich are developing graphene sensors like the ones depicted above to serve as artificial retinas. The atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms is being used because it is thin, flexible, stronger than steel, transparent and electrically conductive. 

TUM physicists think that all of these characteristics and graphene’s compatibility with the body make it a strong contender to serve as the interface between a retinal prosthetic that converts light to electric impulses and the optic nerve. A graphene-based sensor could help blind people with healthy nerve tissue see, they say.

Read More

Friday, August 15, 2014 Monday, July 28, 2014

Another 101 on Quantum Computing this time from Microsoft

An introduction to the mind-bending world of quantum computing. Learn how Microsoft is blending quantum physics with computer science at http://www.microsoft.com/StationQ

Monday, June 30, 2014

Quantum Computing Explained by Isaac McAuley

This video shows how quantum computers work (in theory). It goes over how superposition and quantum entanglement can be used to change the world of computers.

Saturday, May 17, 2014
HYPERMORGEN ICONS
We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 
Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.
We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook! 
Get the Icons at the The Noun Project! 
The icons en detail:
Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more] 
Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more] 
Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more] 
Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more] 
Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more] 
Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more] 
Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more] 
Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more] 
+++ THX A LOT +++
Fast.co Exist: Icons For The Near Future, From Printable Meat To Autonomous Car Warnings - These visuals create a thought-provoking shorthand for the issues that will be created by our emerging technologies.
Bruce Sterling: Design Fiction - Hypermorgen icons
PSFK: Simple Icons Help Visualize - The Trends Of The Near     Future

HYPERMORGEN ICONS

We recently designed some icons to represent topics that will most likely become increasingly interesting in the next few years. 

Some of them are tongue in cheek (like the standford bunnies in the 3D replication icon), some are more critical (like the synthetic biology spidergoat). They are meant to provoke different associations to start discussions about the future.

We would like to create some more. Suggestions welcome via mail, twitter or facebook

Get the Icons at the The Noun Project

The icons en detail:

  • Slime Mold Computing Slime mold can not only determine the shortest path through a maze or model optimal railway systems. Scientists from the University of the West of England discovered that Physarum polycephalum slime molds can act as memristors. This means they could be used to create more efficient computer memory. [read more
  • Wearables For some futurists wearables are already half over, soon to be replaced by ingestibles. We think wearables will become interesting in ways we now can´t even imagine. [read more
  • Meat Printing Humans eat about 240 billion kilograms of meat each year. The demand for animal protein has resulted in environmental degradation, cruelty to livestock, and the spread of dangerous diseases. Thiel Foundation just funded Modern Meadow, a company that wants to solve this problem with a new method to print meat with a 3D printer. Will it taste better or worse than Tofurkey? [read more]
  • Autonomous Car The future of mobility. If the politicians don´t f*ck it up… [read more
  • Graphene The infamous new Wondermaterial almost every big company is dreaming of. The EU just threw a Billion Bucks at research projects dealing with graphene. Let´s keep our fingers crossed… [read more
  • Exoskeleton Known from Science Fiction since more than a century, powered exoskeletons could become relevant in many areas apart from human warfare or for the rehabilitation afterwards. [read more]
  • 3D-Replication While everybody is already fed up with the ubiquitous talk about 3D, we think with 3D scanners becoming affordable 3D replication is going to explode. Think of Copyshops for Objects with the possibility to remix and mash! (Rabbits as a symbol for fast replication? Yeah, we know… but at least it´s the Stanford Bunny.) [read more
  • Encrypted eMail Thanks to the NSA, the eMail Icon needs an upgrade. And don´t forget to update your eMail to encrypted eMail, too… [read more
  • Brain Machine Interface Especially interesting in Combination with other Developments on the Horizon, e.g. Exosceletons. The next logical Step after we all have been assimilated with Google Glass… [read more
  • Synthetic Biology Synthetic Biology is on the rise. Cabbage has been grown with scorpion venom. Mice have been bred to chirp like birds. Glow-in-the-dark kitties and pigs are real. And, naturally, scientists created a goat-spider hybrid to produce synthetic silk. [read more

+++ THX A LOT +++

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

txchnologist:

BBC Knowledge and Learning explains the basics of genetics with style. Watch the whole video below.

Read More

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
Prediction or Influence?
A History of Books that Forecast the Future
[via io9]

Prediction or Influence?

A History of Books that Forecast the Future

[via io9]

Sunday, April 27, 2014

pewinternet:

Our recent survey with Smithsonian magazine on Americans’ attitudes toward the future of science and technology found some striking differences between women and men in their hopes and fears about the future. Here are a few key themes.

Sunday, April 20, 2014 Wednesday, April 9, 2014

txchnologist:

App Uses Google Glass To Diagnose Disease

The American Chemical Society has the story of some interesting work that might let healthcare providers use Google Glass for medical testing. 

UCLA researchers have built an app that lets users take pictures of test samples and upload them for remote diagnostic analysis. The system can already perform dozens of different tests, including those for malaria, prostate cancer and HIV. The work effectively removes the need for a nearby brick-and-mortar laboratory to analyze samples.

Watch the video, and read about more breakthrough work being done by UCLA engineer Aydogan Ozcan and his group.

Read More

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Keeping secrets in a world of spies and mistrust

Artur Ekert, co-inventor of quantum cryptography, explains in Nature what it takes to keep our secrets secret, even when faced with the double challenge of mistrust and manipulation.

Want to learn more? See the article “The ultimate physical limits of privacy” in Nature:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13132

Or this summary on CQT’s website: http://www.quantumlah.org/highlight/1…

Artur Ekert is Director of the Centre for Quantum Technologies and Lee Kong Chian Centennial Professor, National University of Singapore, Professor of Quantum Physics at the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, UK

Abstract of Nature paper

Among those who make a living from the science of secrecy, worry and paranoia are just signs of professionalism. Can we protect our secrets against those who wield superior technological powers? Can we trust those who provide us with tools for protection? Can we even trust ourselves, our own freedom of choice? Recent developments in quantum cryptography show that some of these questions can be addressed and discussed in precise and operational terms, suggesting that privacy is indeed possible under surprisingly weak assumptions.

[via kurzweilAI] [Paper]

Friday, March 21, 2014 Monday, February 24, 2014
emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check

Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.
A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.

Full Story: Io9

emergentfutures:

Computers are providing solutions to math problems that we can’t check

Good news! A computer has solved the longstanding Erdős discrepancy problem! Trouble is, we have no idea what it’s talking about — because the solution, which is as long as all of Wikipedia’s pages combined, is far too voluminous for us puny humans to confirm.

A few years ago, the mathematician Steven Strogatz predicted that it wouldn’t be too much longer before computer-assisted solutions to math problems will be beyond human comprehension. Well, we’re pretty much there. In this case, it’s an answer produced by a computer that was hammering away at the Erdős discrepancy problem.

Full Story: Io9