Tuesday, July 23, 2013
Leap Motion Review
Today I received my Leap Motion device. Well, lets say it is a rocky start and it feels more like a beta than a proven release.Some apps work pretty much as you’d expect. Pinching, zooming, swiping are fully supported and it feels right to play Cut the Rope with a movement of your finger or to move around in a sample of a simple DNA segment. Unfortunately, the Mac OS UX is overall disappointing (although - with a little practice - scrolling in websites and documents works well).
From Engadget:

Desktop control relies on dividing 3D space into two separate zones: one closer to your body, which is for “hovering,” and one closer to the display, which is for “touching.” In other words, it’s just like hovering with a stylus before making contact with the screen on a Wacom tablet or Galaxy Note — and hence it sounds like it should be intuitive. However, in practice we found that every time we moved a finger towards the computer monitor, the cursor drooped on the vertical axis, causing a mishit. This is because it’s very hard to prevent your index finger from dropping slightly as it moves away from your body — an inevitable consequence of the human elbow joint. Although practice would probably have improved the situation, we gave up after about 20 minutes due to its fairly steep learning curve and an encroaching sense that our time-limited existence on this beautiful planet was ebbing away.

That is true for sure. But I’m still in a positive mood, because it feels kind of good and I’m curious about further developments.
For a closer look read the in detail and more or less positive reviews by TechReview, Engadget and The Verge.

Leap Motion Review

Today I received my Leap Motion device. Well, lets say it is a rocky start and it feels more like a beta than a proven release.
Some apps work pretty much as you’d expect. Pinching, zooming, swiping are fully supported and it feels right to play Cut the Rope with a movement of your finger or to move around in a sample of a simple DNA segment. Unfortunately, the Mac OS UX is overall disappointing (although - with a little practice - scrolling in websites and documents works well).

From Engadget:

Desktop control relies on dividing 3D space into two separate zones: one closer to your body, which is for “hovering,” and one closer to the display, which is for “touching.” In other words, it’s just like hovering with a stylus before making contact with the screen on a Wacom tablet or Galaxy Note — and hence it sounds like it should be intuitive. However, in practice we found that every time we moved a finger towards the computer monitor, the cursor drooped on the vertical axis, causing a mishit. This is because it’s very hard to prevent your index finger from dropping slightly as it moves away from your body — an inevitable consequence of the human elbow joint. Although practice would probably have improved the situation, we gave up after about 20 minutes due to its fairly steep learning curve and an encroaching sense that our time-limited existence on this beautiful planet was ebbing away.

That is true for sure. But I’m still in a positive mood, because it feels kind of good and I’m curious about further developments.

For a closer look read the in detail and more or less positive reviews by TechReview, Engadget and The Verge.

Notes

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    Leap Motion…Interface tactile en test. Aujourd’hui, j’ai reçu mon appareil Motion Leap. Eh bien, disons que c’est un...
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