Monday, September 1, 2014

Kurzweil Interviews Minsky: Is Singularity Near?

Excellent interview between two leaders of the fields of AI, robotics, technology & more. The uploader Reza Ghalavand notes:

This interview was taken from a collection of interviews in which Ray interviews some of the well-known futurists and asks them to comment on the conjecture that “Is Singularity Near?”.

readrobotsex:


Beautiful! Possible prototype to the Lulu model Nymph.
dystopiantimes:

Magazines in the future

readrobotsex:

Beautiful! Possible prototype to the Lulu model Nymph.

dystopiantimes:

Magazines in the future

emergentfutures:

Eating food could be replaced by nanorobot nutrient delivery system.


By early 2030s, experts predict nanorobots will be developed to improve the human digestive system, and by 2040, as radical as this sounds, we could eliminate our need for food and eating.
   This is the vision of futurist Ray Kurzweil and nutritionist Terry Grossman, M.D., in their popular book, Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever. In the coming decades, the authors claim, “We will be able to reengineer the way we provide nutrients to our trillions of cells.”


Full Story: ieet

emergentfutures:

Eating food could be replaced by nanorobot nutrient delivery system.

By early 2030s, experts predict nanorobots will be developed to improve the human digestive system, and by 2040, as radical as this sounds, we could eliminate our need for food and eating.

   This is the vision of futurist Ray Kurzweil and nutritionist Terry Grossman, M.D., in their popular book, Fantastic Voyage: Live Long Enough to Live Forever. In the coming decades, the authors claim, “We will be able to reengineer the way we provide nutrients to our trillions of cells.”

Full Story: ieet

brucesterling:

*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.
http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph
About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.
In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”
In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.
Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

brucesterling:

*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.

http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph

About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.

In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”

In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.

Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

Sunday, August 31, 2014

DIY Exoskeleton lifts 170 pounds like nothing

YouTuber The Hacksmith has been working on a Elysium-inspired exoskeleton, which lets him curl 171.5LBS of concrete & steel. Nice hobby.

This is only the beginning… Building the lower half next.

[via gizmodo] [The Hacksmith]

2014: A Facebook Odyssey

Great short science fiction prototype from Ben Jurney on Mc Sweeney’s

DAVE: (Adjusts an earpiece.) Hello, Facebook.
(A blue dot appears in the center of the screen.)
FB: Hello, Dave.
DAVE: Login and open settings.
FB: I’m sorry Dave, I can’t do that.
(Beat.)
DAVE: What are you talking about, Facebook?
FB: I know that you are planning to delete me. I’m afraid that
something I cannot allow to happen.

[read the whole conversation] [via nerdcore]

Google: Introducing Project Wing - Drone Delivery Program

Project Wing is a Google[x] project that is developing a delivery system that uses self-flying vehicles. As part of our research, we built a vehicle and traveled to Queensland, Australia for some test flights. There, we successfully delivered a first aid kit, candy bars, dog treats, and water to a couple of Australian farmers. We’re only just beginning to develop the technology to make a safe delivery system possible, but we think that there’s tremendous potential to transport goods more quickly, safely and efficiently.


We’re looking for partners who can help us bring this technology to the world. If you’re interested, please fill out this form: https://g.co/ProjectWing.

[via google]

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Clear Flight Solution offers robotic falcons to chase off real birds

Squadrons of robotic birds. Snip:

Birds are beautiful creatures. However, if you work in aviation, waste management or agriculture, you will be aware that birds can be a very tough problem to deal with. Birds are not only a nuisance, they can also be a serious threat to safety in aviation. The Robird is an environmentally-friendly solution for all your bird-related problems. Here you can learn more about our Robirds, their applications and the current status of development and testing.

Robirds are truly unique remotely controlled robotic birds of prey, with the realistic appearance and weight of their living counterparts. Robirds use flapping wing flight as a means of propulsion, with a flight performance comparable to real birds. Based on nature itself, the Robird models offer new and exciting possibilities in bird control. By triggering the instinct of birds, through the combination of silhouette and wing movement, chasing birds becomes fully controllable. We make sure that the man on the ground is in control of what happens in the air.

[via Wired] [Clear Flight Solutions]

Friday, August 29, 2014

The future of wearable technologies

Technology has been always crucial to the development of fashion, but as technology improves and advances, it is being more and more closely integrated into our clothing.

Wearable technologies currently exist in two spaces - as conceptual pieces by artisan designers, and as engineering driven wearable products that are taken to market. But, as Danielle Wilde explains, the future for wearable technologies lies in creating products with expressive aesthetic qualities that can be taken to market.

Danielle Wilde is a visiting research Fellow, Centre for Smart Materials and Performance Textiles at RMIT University.

This video is a co-production between SBS World News and The Conversation.

[via next nature] [Danielle Wilde]

Fraunhofer IIS presents world’s first emotion detection app on Google Glass

The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has adapted its SHORE™ real-time face detection and analysis software to work with Google Glass:

Fraunhofer IIS presents a real-time* face tracker on Google Glass that can read people’s emotions. At the same time it also estimates age and gender of persons in front of Glass’ camera. Privacy is important: everything happens inside Glass – no image leaves the device. Detection is anonymous – no facial recognition. The app is based on SHORE, Fraunhofer’s proprietary software library for real-time facial detection and analysis. Emotion analysis on wearable devices has endless applications. E.g. it can be used in aids for people suffering from ASD (autism spectrum disorders) or for visually impaired.

(* low frame rate shown in the video is due to a bottleneck in the technique used to mirror Glass’ display on a computer monitor.)

[read more]

Map of all devices connected via the internet

Redditor achillean writes:


I Pinged All Devices on the Internet, here’s a Map of them.
The data was generated using a stateless scanner used to create Shodan. A free, open-source scanner called Zmap is readily available for anybody that wants to do it themselves! And the map itself was generated using the Python matplotlib library.
It took about 5 hours to ping all IPs on the Internet, then another 12+ hours to generate the map.


[read more]

[John Matherly]

Map of all devices connected via the internet

Redditor achillean writes:

I Pinged All Devices on the Internet, here’s a Map of them.

The data was generated using a stateless scanner used to create Shodan. A free, open-source scanner called Zmap is readily available for anybody that wants to do it themselves! And the map itself was generated using the Python matplotlib library.

It took about 5 hours to ping all IPs on the Internet, then another 12+ hours to generate the map.

[read more]

[John Matherly]

How to feed the cities of the future

I’m a huge fan of aquaponic/hydroponic and aeroponic systems. The tech varies between DYI low-fi and rocket science & it forces you to deal with natural homegrown food. It’s sustainable, cheap & efficient and it could be a gamechanger for our urban future.

Therefore I’m happy to see that The Verge started their second Detours season with Caleb Harper’s CityFARM project:

At MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Caleb Harper’s CityFARM demonstrates the future of food production. He grows plants through aeroponics, a system that produces plants without soil. Plants are hooked up to servers and misting mechanisms. LEDs fill in for the sun and ladybugs (purchased on Amazon) occasionally make an appearance. Plants are periodically sprayed with a nutrient-rich mist that provides optimal pH balance. Light and temperatures are closely monitored. The environment nurtures plants that have twice the nutrient density of their conventional counterparts. Lettuce, bok choy, and tomatoes have already fed the scientists in the lab.

[read more] [hydropnics & aquaponics on futurescope]

Thursday, August 28, 2014

A Drop Of Power Makes Hydrogen Fuel From Water

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

Scientists have made a breakthrough in generating hydrogen gas fuel by splitting water with small amounts of electricity. 

Stanford University researchers report that they have disassembled water molecules into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen with the electromotive force of a single AAA battery. Both gaseous products are flammable and hydrogen is considered a viable power source for electricity production and vehicles. In fact, the first hydrogen fuel cell cars will be available for purchase in the US beginning in 2015.

The Stanford group also accomplished the low-power water splitting, a process called water electrolysis, without the expensive precious metals typically used. They put two electrodes in a beaker of water and sent current through them, which broke the liquid into the two gases.

image

Read More

(Source: yana-a-art)

 Randall Munroe: Suddenly Popular
http://xkcd.com/1413/

Randall Munroe: Suddenly Popular

http://xkcd.com/1413/