Thursday, August 21, 2014

Radio Open Source: The End of Work with Ray Kurzweil, Andrew McAfee, Chris Lydon

The jobless economy: a fully automated, engineered, robotic system that doesn’t need you, or me either. Anything we can do, machines can do better — surgery, warfare, farming, finance. What’s to do? Shall we smash the machines, or go to the beach, or finally learn to play the piano?

Podcast with

  • Ray Kurzweil: Director of Engineering at Google, futurist, inventor, and author of The Age of Spiritual Machinesand The Singularity Is Near.
  • Andrew McAfee: Director of the Initiative on the Digital Economy at MIT, author of The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies.
  • Charles Derber: sociologist and author of The Surplus American.
  • Sarah Jaffe: journalist and host of Dissent’s labor podcast “Belabored”

[read more]

U.S. Navy To Test And Evaluate Lockheed Martin Industrial Exoskeletons

Lockheed Martin has received a contract through the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) for the U.S. Navy to evaluate and test two FORTIS exoskeletons. This marks the first procurement of Lockheed Martin’s exoskeletons for industrial use. Terms of the contract were not disclosed.

The FORTIS exoskeleton is an unpowered, lightweight exoskeleton that increases an operator’s strength and endurance by transferring the weight of heavy loads from the user’s body directly to the ground.

The objective of this effort is to mature and transition exoskeleton technology to the Department of Defense industrial base and perform testing and evaluation for industrial hand-tool applications at Navy shipyards.

[read more] [via endgadget] [picture credits: Lockheed Martin]

justinpickard:

Urban Nomads is the first book about an upcoming and hard-to-define new lifestyle. It sheds a light on possible new ways of living, working, cooking, and medical care in an age of increasing flexibility. The book is a huge catalogue of movable micro buildings and well-designed solutions for on-the-go living experiences, all based around themes like instant housing, instant cooking, instant exhibition, and instant help.’

(‘Urban Nomads: Design For A Lifestyle On The Go’)

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

txchnologist:

Graphene-Based Artificial Retina Sensor Being Developed

Researchers at Germany’s Technical University of Munich are developing graphene sensors like the ones depicted above to serve as artificial retinas. The atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms is being used because it is thin, flexible, stronger than steel, transparent and electrically conductive. 

TUM physicists think that all of these characteristics and graphene’s compatibility with the body make it a strong contender to serve as the interface between a retinal prosthetic that converts light to electric impulses and the optic nerve. A graphene-based sensor could help blind people with healthy nerve tissue see, they say.

Read More

Infiniti Q50 Active Lane Control - Selfdriving Car

Don’t do this. Never! They should be glad that nothing bad happened.

Hands Free Driving: Let’s see how well the Active Lane Control works on the new Infiniti Q50S Hybrid. 
The interesting bit: The system doesn’t turn off if you take your hands off the steering wheel (or leave the drivers seat entirely).

Read more here: http://vanishingpoint.at/wordpress/20…

Here’s another stupid active lane assist stunt, which proves that ALA is basically a hands-off autonomous cruise system if you disable the safety timeout:

Autonomous driving in a 2014 S Class 500 - with Automatic Cruise Control & “disabled” timeout for ALA - of course dont try this at home ;)

[via roadtrack & IEEE]

emergentfutures:

Wearable tech can be implanted in brains, thanks to new power technique


A research breakthrough has identified a way to charge tiny health-tracking devices that could be embedded in our brains, hearts or livers

Full Story: The Guardian

emergentfutures:

Wearable tech can be implanted in brains, thanks to new power technique

A research breakthrough has identified a way to charge tiny health-tracking devices that could be embedded in our brains, hearts or livers

Full Story: The Guardian

NASA presents Robo-Glove - a wearable human grasp assist device

Researchers at the NASA Johnson Space Center in collaboration with General Motors have designed and developed Robo-Glove, a wearable human grasp assist device, to help reduce the grasping force needed to operate tools for an extended time or for repetitive motion tasks. This wearable device allows the user to tightly grip tools and other items for longer periods of time without experiencing muscle discomfort or strain. The Robo-Glove also has potential applications in prosthetic devices, rehabilitation aids, and people with impaired or limited arm and hand muscle strength.

The Robo-Glove is a patented technology available for commercial technology licensing. For more information about Robo-Glove and other technology license opportunities, visit:http://technology.jsc.nasa.gov

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like -NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet. - Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

wildcat2030:

This is what your home on Mars could look like
-
NASA JPL and Makerbot have announced the winners of their Thingiverse Mars Base challenge to design and 3D print a human habitat for the Red Planet.
-
Humans living on Mars is a fascinating concept. We already have Mars One looking to establish a Mars colony, and NASA planning manned missions to the Red Planet, with one objective being to assess the feasibility of living there; whether Mars has the resources necessary for human survival, and whether we have the technology to create what we need. While, however, it’s still a distant dream, that hasn’t stopped people from thinking about how we might live if we get there. Recently, NASA and Makerbot held the Mars Base challenge: to design human habitation, using materials either found on Mars or brought from Earth, that could be 3D printed. With 228 submissions on Thingiverse, the competition was fierce — but the three top designs are in, with the first place winner receiving a MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D printer and spools of MakerBot PLA filament going to second and third. (via This is what your home on Mars could look like - CNET)

baked-design:

OwnPhones Wireless Custom-Fit 3D-Printed Earbuds

Price: $149+

Ownphones has progressed a lot in the several months since it first announced its entrance into the 3D-printed custom-fit wireless headphones space. Here we see the actual guts, and the multitude of applications from sportswear to casual or even more fashionable accessorized designs. 

Buy

Link

designculturemind:

Real-Time Face Tracking and Projection Mapping

Impressive proof-of-concept demonstration from OMOTE which accurately projects visuals onto a moving human face - video embedded below:

[Link]

Friday, August 15, 2014

CGP Grey: Humans need not apply

Great video essay about automation and the pro/cons of robotic labor.  Highly recommended viewing.

[more at reddit] [via michellzappa]

Lego Mark VI Mindstorms Robotic Hand and Arm

Four independently motorized fingers controlled individually by four touch sensors; powered by one Mindstorms EV3.
Flair includes a mount for my cell phone (just for my convenience), a blue light-up bar, and 5 blue LEDs.

I wore this for 2 hours in low light during the “world of lights” event at BrickFair VA 2014 (all overhead lights in the expo hall turned off so lit-up MOCs could shine).
I also wore this for several hours during the public days, Saturday & Sunday, August 2nd & 3rd — shaking hands with attendees all day.

Physical build time: off & on for many evenings.
Programming time: 1 hour.
No I don’t have instructions written up to share.

[via nerdcore]

Temporary tattoo produces power from perspiration

August 12, 2014 5:31 PM EDTResearchers at the University of California-San Diego report that they have developed a sensor in the form of a temporary tattoo that not only measures exercise progress, but can harvest energy from sweat to power small electrical devises. (The American Chemical Society)

[read more] [via @JoshKrisch]