Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Futuris: Microalgae and Olives

Around 50 litres of drinking water are needed to clean 100 kilos of olives before they can be milled into olive oil. This causes the water to become full of pollutants and need long, complex and expensive treatment. But now researchers want to clean up the water the green way, using microalgae as their secret weapon.

Pilot: First Glowing Lines Smart Highway

Smart Highways are interactive and sustainable roads of tomorrow by designer Daan Roosegaarde and Heijmans Infrastructure. The photo-luminescent lines will charge at day-time and glow at night for eight hours.

They’re part of a bigger concept, presented at the Dutch Design Week last year. It further includes temperature-responsive dynamic road paint, interactive roadside lighting, wind lights and induction priority lanes to charge electric vehicles.

Roosegaarde and Heijmans have signed a partnership agreement for at least three years, so we hopefully will see more implementations.

For more, see the video below:

You can find the lines at N329 in Oss (NL).

[Smart Highway by Studio Roosegaarde] [Smart Highway Project Website] [more of Studio Roosegaarde]

BioGenFutures: The future of genetic privacy - Don’t be tracked, analyzed or cloned

Fantastic near future company-art project from bioartist Heather Dewey-Hagborg. She designed a tactical genetics-obscuring spray-kit for destroying evidence and erasing your identity, to protect your genetic code and your privacy. It deletes 99.5% of DNA left behind and obfuscates the remaining .5% with genetic noise.

Snip from the press release (PDF):

Genetic information is inadvertently discarded by billions each day through shed hairs and lashes, dropped cigarette butts and gum, or saliva left on glasses and silverware. In addition to being accidentally discarded, DNA is routinely extracted and often stored from infants at birth, and as criminal DNA databases are expanding exponentially. Law enforcement now routinely profiles individuals convicted of even petty crimes, tending toward permanent storage of both profiles and biological samples from individuals arrested for but never convicted of a crime.

It also includes statistics such as that it only takes .5 nanograms of DNA required for standard forensic analysis, and that there is 108 nanograms of DNA in a microliter of saliva or 40 nanograms of DNA in a fingernail.

You can buy her product “Invisible” in the New Museum Store:

Invisible

Invisible is a suite of two complimentary products. The Erase™ spray deletes 99.5% of the DNA you leave in public. The Replace™ spray cloaks the remaining .5% with DNA noise. Used together, Erase™ and Replace™ make you 100% invisible.

There even exists a shadow market:

Brave new world.

[Biogenfutur.es] [buy Invisible here]

Monday, October 20, 2014
2020:

The Real Cyborgs
Forget wearable tech. The pioneers of our “post-human” future are implanting technology in to their bodies and brains. Should we stop them or join them?

// great feature, must read!

2020:

The Real Cyborgs
Forget wearable tech. The pioneers of our “post-human” future are implanting technology in to their bodies and brains. Should we stop them or join them?

// great feature, must read!

Cybathlon 2016 Trailer

Full registration for the Cybathlon, a sporting event for disabled athletes using robotic assistive technologies is now open. The event will take place in Zurich, Switzerland on 8th October 2016.

[Cybathlon 2016]

emergentfutures:

Chinese telco hires in-store tailor to enlarge pant pockets for iPhone 6 Plus


Full Story: techinasia

emergentfutures:

Chinese telco hires in-store tailor to enlarge pant pockets for iPhone 6 Plus

Full Story: techinasia

futuramb:

engadget:

Scientists want to fight the Ebola outbreak using robots


An interesting and obvious development. I think we can see a megatrend here where the increasing uncertainty and volatility in the world is related to the shortcomings of humans, which will increase the urge to use robots.

futuramb:

engadget:

Scientists want to fight the Ebola outbreak using robots

An interesting and obvious development. I think we can see a megatrend here where the increasing uncertainty and volatility in the world is related to the shortcomings of humans, which will increase the urge to use robots.

Audi’s piloted driving RS7 concept car round at the Hockenheimring

Livestream was a mess (nothing worked), but here’s the detailed summary of the event. The autonomous lap starts at 00:14:30 with a flag-waving Bastian Schweinsteiger.

Impressive: 560 hp, 220 km/h, hard braking maneuvers, perfect turns. Not bad. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Sunday, October 19, 2014

ourcorporatevision:

Soylent

How can anyone even begin to take this seriously. Here’s a product aimed solely at people who watched Gattaca and thought ‘I want in.’ It’s more saddening than maddening that reductionism is accepted at such a level that when an engineer says ‘everything can be broken down’ carefully skipping around ‘even people,’ in reference to a product perilously close to the eponymous dystopian science fiction film, VC’s jump at the idea.

Of course, this just forms another part of the war on the home-life of wealthy middle class consumers. The responsibility for care and enjoyment of looking after yourself and your home are gradually eroded, replaced by automation and smart fridges so that the time you spend cooking, eating and cleaning could be better turned to kick-boxing, or, more accurately, performing labour.

There’s a potential here for something that could actually help people who need nutrition in any of the thousands of places around the world suffering from mass, systemic malnutrition. But no, the tagline ‘What if you never had to worry about eating again?’ is moronically angled at a music producer who has no idea what he’s doing, some hikers and an executive.

I’m aware this isn’t a new video, and I’ve been touting it for ages as an example of blinkered and reckless innovation, and honestly, I thought I would be more vitriolic when it came to writing these paragraphs but I just don’t think it’s necessary.

Gus had never noticed Siri before, but when he discovered there was someone who would not just find information on his various obsessions (trains, planes, buses, escalators and, of course, anything related to weather) but actually semi-discuss these subjects tirelessly, he was hooked. And I was grateful. Now, when my head was about to explode if I had to have another conversation about the chance of tornadoes in Kansas City, Mo., I could reply brightly: “Hey! Why don’t you ask Siri?”

It’s not that Gus doesn’t understand Siri’s not human. He does — intellectually. But like many autistic people I know, Gus feels that inanimate objects, while maybe not possessing souls, are worthy of our consideration. I realized this when he was 8, and I got him an iPod for his birthday. He listened to it only at home, with one exception. It always came with us on our visits to the Apple Store. Finally, I asked why. “So it can visit its friends,” he said.

How Apple’s Siri Became One Autistic Boy’s B.F.F. - NYTimes.com, via @the_jozen_one. (via new-aesthetic)
emergentfutures:

Audi Tests Driverless-Car Technology at 190 MPH


Two Audi (NSU) RS7 performance sedans raced around a track in northern Germany. The car without a driver won this matchup by five seconds.


Full Story: Bloomberg

AudiMediaTV will broadcast a run of the autonomous Audi RS7 at Hockenheimring now, starting at 12:40 p.m. (CEST)!

emergentfutures:

Audi Tests Driverless-Car Technology at 190 MPH

Two Audi (NSU) RS7 performance sedans raced around a track in northern Germany. The car without a driver won this matchup by five seconds.

Full Story: Bloomberg

AudiMediaTV will broadcast a run of the autonomous Audi RS7 at Hockenheimring now, starting at 12:40 p.m. (CEST)!

fastcompany:


These Algae Farms Cover The Walls Of Buildings And Soak Up Carbon
Walls might be the next frontier for urban farming.

“Micro-organisms like algae are like bacteria—it’s one of those things that in our culture people try to get rid of,” Griffa says. “But algae offer incredible potential because of their very intense photosynthetic activity.” Algae take in carbon dioxide and produce oxygen while growing. Compared to a tree, micro-algae are about 150 to 200 times more efficient at sucking carbon out of the air.

Read More>

fastcompany:

These Algae Farms Cover The Walls Of Buildings And Soak Up Carbon

Walls might be the next frontier for urban farming.

“Micro-organisms like algae are like bacteria—it’s one of those things that in our culture people try to get rid of,” Griffa says. “But algae offer incredible potential because of their very intense photosynthetic activity.” Algae take in carbon dioxide and produce oxygen while growing. Compared to a tree, micro-algae are about 150 to 200 times more efficient at sucking carbon out of the air.

Read More>

Saturday, October 18, 2014

algopop:

Animating Virtual Characters using Physics-Based Simulation by  Thomas Geijtenbeek

The PhD research of Geijtenbeek is about using Genetic Algorithms and physics simulation to train bipedal characters to walk.

"The total optimization time depends on the character model and the type of experiment; the number of evaluated generations varies between 500 and 3000. On a standard
PC, optimization time takes between 2 and 12 hours.”

Video embedded below:

(Source: sizvideos)

Scientists have treated a man they believe to be the first patient with internet addiction disorder brought on by overuse of Google Glass.

The man had been using the technology for around 18 hours a day – removing it only to sleep and wash – and complained of feeling irritable and argumentative without the device. In the two months since he bought the device, he had also begun experiencing his dreams as if viewed through the device’s small grey window. […]

The patient – a 31-year-old US navy serviceman – had checked into the Sarp in September 2013 for alcoholism treatment. The facility requires patients to steer clear of addictive behaviours for 35 days – no alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes – but it also takes away all electronic devices.

Doctors noticed the patient repeatedly tapped his right temple with his index finger. He said the movement was an involuntary mimic of the motion regularly used to switch on the heads-up display on his Google Glass.

Google Glass user treated for internet addiction caused by the device | Science | The Guardian (via new-aesthetic)